Legitimate concerns?

There's been a lot said in the last few days about migrants - how they should be listed and categorised, how people's "legitimate concerns" over influxes of labour should be heard, how funding should be changed so we don't have to invite so many, say, doctors to work here. I am not a migrant in …

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Black Country Irish: Wolverhampton, 1851

I'm starting my series on the Irish in the 19th century Black Country by looking at Wolverhampton. This is familiar ground for me, or at least should be - so I'm broadening my normal hyper-local view of Carribee Island out to look at some quantitative data on Wolverhampton as a whole. My hope is that this will …

“I wanna see some history”: the Sex Pistols at Club Lafayette

I've been reading, on and off, Greil Marcus' fascinating, rambling account of May 1968, punk, dada, and a bunch of other things besides, Lipstick Traces: The secret history of the twentieth century. It's a liberating experience, when most history books are focused on a reasonably discrete set of dates, themes or spaces, to be carried along …

Walkies

Just a quick one to say a massive thank you to everyone that came out on a bright - but chilly - Saturday to have a walk around one of the less glamorous parts of Wolverhampton this weekend. Thanks too to Wolverhampton Art Gallery for organising it. I had a fantastic time wandering around the remains …

The Other immigrants of Carribee Island: “men of colour” in the 1860s

One of the most fun elements of my research to date has been trawling the British Newspaper Archive for references to my study area - mostly because you just never know what you might find. There's likely to be plenty of property sales, perhaps reference to the grand annual event which was the municipal licensing …

The Other immigrants of Carribee Island: Wolverhampton’s Jewish community 2

This post follows my first on the early Jewish community in mid-19th century Wolverhampton, last week. We explored the Bernsteins who lived at 64 Canal Street, and the opening of the Fryer Street Synagogue, Wolverhampton's first permanent such building. By 1871, I can't find the Bernsteins in the Canal Street area, but I can find others I …

The Other immigrants of Carribee Island: Wolverhampton’s Jewish community 1

My PhD research focuses on a small section of Wolverhampton town centre in the nineteenth century that was well-known - perhaps notorious, even - for it's substantial Irish immigrant population. "Carribee Island" and the "Stafford Street district" became by-words when any sort of unrest occurred amongst Wolverhampton's Irish. My cursory go at statistics so far …