Distance and Strangeness: the murder of Anne Spencer

I sometimes feel like I've spent the last three years trying to figure out my place within history. I still feel like there's probably a huge mountain of scholarship that I've completely missed, but in general I'm starting to work out what historiography is (I'm not a historian by background - everyone else just calls it 'the literature' …

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Maps and legends

  This week's big adventure was a trip to the fabled meadows of Cambridge or, at least, the brutalist Robinson College (see Otto Saumarez-Smith's paper on it here) and an ugly Travelodge overlooking some flats. The Urban History Group conference was the first academic conference I ever attended, this time last year, and this year was …

Update

I haven't done a normal post today, but it did occur to me that a quick outline of my research might be of interest to some. I tend to only blog about things that are peripheral to my actual PhD - like the Jewish families I discussed recently, or the series on other Black Country "slums". …

Space to think

GIS is increasingly being seen as much as a place to think as a simple data management and mapping tool Gillings & Goodrick (1996) "Sensuous and reflexive GIS: exploring visualisation and VRML"  I'm very grateful to have been allowed to sit in on a GIS course this semester with students from the Archaeology department. Whilst the material is …

Microstoria

Montaillou, in the French Midi-Pyrénées. The town is best known for being the focus of Emmanuel Le Roy's study of heresy in medieval France. I enjoyed reading Brodie Waddell's post on microhistory yesterday (if you don't follow the many-headed monster already, you should - the blog is not strictly in my era, if you like, but …