Bibliography: Local studies of the Irish in 19th Century Britain

This bibliography reflects the importance of local case studies in understanding the Irish population in Victorian Britain. The differences in the experience of an Irish immigrant in this time could be substantial, depending on whether they were Protestant or Catholic, comfortable or poor, male or female, a fluent English speaker or not, and where they were from in Ireland itself. Here, though, I’ve organised it by where they migrated to, because local political cultures, religious organisation, demographics, economy and so on all had a huge impact on the experiences and outcomes of Irish lives.

This is really a smaller, differently organised version of the amazing Irish Diaspora Histories Bibliography. To keep it manageable, these are peer-reviewed/academic/learned journal publications, suitable to be consulted and referenced in academic research or assignments. It’s divided alphabetically by counties/towns as they were in the 19th century – by “local studies” I refer to county or town level, plus Scotland and Wales, so it leaves out anything so general as “the north,” for instance. The map below shows the distribution of these studies.

I’m always looking to be updated on these (especially as I don’t have access to check this in detail at the moment!), so please get in touch if you can add anything.

Contents

Overviews

  • Davis, Graham. The Irish in Britain: 1815-1914. Dublin: Gill & MacMillan, 1991.
  • Fielding, Steven. Class and Ethnicity: Irish Catholics in England, 1880-1939. Buckingham: Open University Press, 1993.
  • Fitzgerald, Patrick, and B. K. Lambkin. Migration in Irish History, 1607-2007. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
  • Fitzpatrick, David. ‘A Curious Middle Place: The Irish in Britain, 1871-1921’. In The Irish in Britain 1815-1939, edited by Sheridan Gilley and Roger Swift, 10–59. Savage, MD: Barnes & Noble Books, 1989.
  • ———. ‘A Peculiar Tramping People: The Irish in Britain, 1801-70’. In A New History of Ireland: Ireland Under the Union, 1801-1870, edited by W. E. Vaughan. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989.
  • Hickman, Mary J. Religion, Class and Identity: The State, the Catholic Church and the Education of the Irish in Britain. Aldershot: Avebury, 1995.
  • Jackson, J. A. The Irish in Britain. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1963.
  • MacRaild, Donald M. Irish Migrants in Modern Britain, 1750-1922. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1999.
  • ———. The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 1750-1939. London: Macmillan Education, 2010.
  • Swift, Roger, and Sheridan Gilley, eds. The Irish in the Victorian City. London: Croom Helm, 1985.
  • ———, eds. The Irish in Britain, 1815-1939. Savage, MD: Barnes & Noble Books, 1989.
  • ———, eds. The Irish in Victorian Britain: The Local Dimension. Dublin: Four Courts, 1999.

Cambridgeshire

  • Cambridge
    • Parkes, Susan M. ‘Intellectual Women: Irish Women at Cambridge, 1875-1904’, in Knowing Their Place : The Intellectual Life of Women in the 19th Century, edited by Brendan M. Walsh. Dublin: History Press Ireland, 2014.

Cheshire

  • Place, G.W. ‘The Repatriation of Irish Vagrants from Cheshire, 1750-1815’. Journal of the Chester Archaeological Society 68, 1985: 125–41.
  • Williams, F.J. ‘Irish in the East Cheshire Silk Industry, 1851-1861’. Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire & Cheshire 136, 1986: 99-126
  • Ashton under Lyne
    • Osgood, Daniel, ‘The Irish in Ashton-under-Lyne in the 1860s’, Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire & Cheshire 149, 1999: 145-71.
  • Birkenhead
    • Boyle, C. J. ‘The Church Militant: The Irish in Birkenhead’, in Shrewsbury: Millennium Essays for a Catholic Diocese. Bath: Downside Abbey, 2000: 179–196.
    • Handley, Mike. ‘Settlement, Disease, Poverty and Conflict: The Irish in Birkenhead, 1841-51’. Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire, 163 (2014): 75–91.
    • Neal, Frank. ‘The Birkenhead Garibaldi Riots of 1862’. Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire 131, 1981: 87–111.
  • Chester
    • Kristina T. Jeffes, ‘The Irish in Early Victorian Chester: An Outcast Community?’, in Victorian Chester : Essays in Social History 1830-1900, edited by Roger Swift. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1996: 85–118.
    • Peavitt, Helen Thais. ‘The Irish, Crime and Disorder in Chester, 1841 to 1871’. PhD, University of Liverpool, 1999.
  • Stockport
    • Sandra Hayton, The Irish Cellar Dwellers: Salford, Stockport and Rochdale, 1861-71, Occasional Papers in Politics and Contemporary History, 28. Salford: University of Salford, Department of Politics and Contemporary History, 1992.
    • Millward, Pauline. ‘The Stockport Riots of 1852: A Study of Anti-Catholic and Anti-Irish Sentiment’. In The Irish in the Victorian City, edited by Roger Swift and Sheridan Gilley. . London: Croom Helm, 1985.

Cornwall

Cumberland

  • MacRaild, Donald M. ‘William Murphy, the Orange Order and Communal Violence: The Irish in West Cumberland, 1871-1884’. In Racial Violence in Britain in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, edited by Panikos Panayi. Leicester: Leicester University Press, 1996: 44–64
  • ———. ‘Culture, Conflict and Labour Migration : Victorian Cumbria’s Ulster Connection’, Saothar: Journal of the Irish Labour History Society 21, 1996: 23–38.
  • ———. Culture, Conflict and Migration: Irish in Victorian Cumbria. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1998.

Durham

  • Bush, Jonathan. “Papists” and Prejudice: Popular Anti-Catholicism and Anglo-Irish Conflict in the North East of England, 1845-70. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013.
  • Cooter, Roger. When Paddy Met Geordie : The Irish in County Durham and Newcastle, 1840-1880 (Sunderland: University of Sunderland Press, 2005).
  • Duffy, Godfrey, ‘The Famine Irish in Newcastle & Co Durham: Sources for Genealogical Research’, Northern Catholic History 42, 2002:59-65.
  • MacDermott, T.P. ‘Irish Workers on Tyneside in the 19th Century’. In Essays in Tyneside Labour History, edited by Norman McCord. Newcastle-upon-Tyne Polytechnic, Department of Humanities, 1977: 154–177
  • Billy Row
    • McManus, Michael. ‘From Townland to Township : The Complex Evolution of a Dissipative Famine Irish Community in County Durham’, North East History 35, 2004: 7–53.
  • Consett
    • Duffy, Godfrey F. ‘County Monaghan Immigrants in the Consett Area of County Durham, England, 1842-1855’, Clogher Record: Journal of the Clogher Historical Society 16(1), 1997: 37–45.
  • Crook
    • McManus, Michael. ‘From Townland to Township : The Complex Evolution of a Dissipative Famine Irish Community in County Durham’, North East History 35, 2004: 7–53.
  • Darlington
    • Lynch, J.G. ‘The Irish population of Darlington in 1841 and 1851’. Durham County Local History Society Bulletin 43, 1991: 35-48
  • Durham
    • McDonnell, Fiona. ‘The Irish in Durham City, 1841-1861’. Durham County Local History Society Bulletin 47, 1991: 68-82
    • McManus, Michael. ‘Folk devils and moral panics? : Irish stereotyping in mid-Victorian Durham’. Durham County Local History Society Bulletin 53, 1994: 27-42
  • Gateshead
    • Neal, Frank. ‘A Statistical Profile of the Irish Community in Gateshead – The Evidence of the 1851 Census’. Immigrants & Minorities 27(1), 2009: 50–81.
  • Hartlepool
    • Bush, Jonathan. ‘The Priest and the Parson of Hartlepool: Protestant-Catholic Conflict in a Nineteenth-Century Industrial Town’. British Catholic History 33(1), 2016: 115–134.
  • Sunderland
    • Fetherston, Vivienne. ‘Irish Catholicism in Sunderland in the Nineteenth Century’, Northern Catholic History 43, 2002: 47–59.
    • MacRaild, Donald M. ‘“Abandon Hibernicisation”: Priests, Ribbonmen and an Irish Street Fight in the North-East of England in 1858’. Historical Research 76(194), 2003: 557–573.
  • Tow Law
    • Norris, P. ‘The Irish in Tow Law, Co. Durham, 1841-1861’. Durham County Local History Society Bulletin 33, 1991: 41-70

Hampshire

  • Matthews, Shirley. ‘“Second Spring” and ’Precious Prejudices’ : Catholicism and Anti-Catholicism in Hampshire in the Era of Emancipation’, in Evangelicals and Catholics in Nineteenth Century Ireland, edited by James H. Murphy. Dublin: Four Courts, 2005: 85–96.

Hertfordshire

  • Solar, Peter Michael & Malcolm T. Smith, ‘Background migration: the Irish (and other strangers) in mid-Victorian Hertfordshire’, Local Population Studies 82, 2009: 44-62.

Kent

  • D. W. Harrington and C. J. Parry, ‘Irish Entries in the 1851 Census Returns of St Mary, Northgate, Canterbury, Kent’, Irish Ancestor 6, 1974: 22–31.

Lancashire

  • Catherine Cox and Hilary Marland, ‘’A Burden on the County’ : Madness, Institutions of Confinement and the Irish Patient in Victorian Lancashire’, Social History of Medicine 28(2), 2015: 263–87.
  • ———, ———, and Sarah York. ‘Emaciated, Exhausted, and Excited: The Bodies and Minds of the Irish in Late Nineteenth-Century Lancashire Asylums’. Journal of Social History 46(2), 2012: 500–524.
  • ———. ‘Itineraries and Experiences of Insanity : Irish Migration and the Management of Mental Illness in Nineteenth-Century Lancashire’, in Migration, Health and Ethnicity in the Modern World, edited by Catherine Cox and Hilary Marland. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013: 36–60.
  • Lowe, W. J. The Irish in Mid-Victorian Lancashire : The Shaping of a Working-Class Community. Oxford: Peter Lang, 1989.
  • ———. ‘The Irish in Lancashire, 1846-71: a social history’, Irish Economic and Social History 2(1), 1975: 63-65.
  • ———. ‘The Lancashire Irish and the Catholic Church, 1846-71: The Social Dimension’. Irish Historical Studies 20(78), 1976: 129–55.
  • ———. ‘Social agencies among the Irish in Lancashire in the mid 19thcentury’, Saothar: Journal of the Irish Labour History Society 3, 15-20.
  • ———. ‘The Chartists and the Irish Confederates: Lancashire, 1848’, Irish Historical Studies 24(94), 1984: 172–96.
  • Moran, Gerard. ‘Nationalists in Exile: The National Brotherhood of St Patrick in Lancashire, 1861-5’. In The Irish in Victorian Britain: The Local Dimension, edited by Roger Swift and Sheridan Gilley, 212–35. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1999.
  • Neal, Frank. ‘English-Irish Conflict in the North-West of England: Economics, Racism, Anti-Catholicism or Simple Xenophobia?’, North-West Labour History 16, 1992: 14–25.
  • ———. ‘Lancashire, the Famine Irish and the Poor Laws: A Study in Crisis Management’. Irish Economic and Social History 22, 1995: 26–48.
  • Pooley, Colin. ‘Irish Settlement in North-West England in the Mid-Nineteenth Century: A Geographical Critique’, North-West Labour History 16, 1992: 26–35.
  • Barrow-in-Furness
    • MacRaild, Donald M. ‘A Case of Undercutting Wages? : Sectarian Tension and the Barrow Anti-Irish Riot of 1864’. Transactions of the Cumberland & Westmorland Antiquarian & Archaeological Society 96, 1996: 215–22.
  • Haslingden
    • Dunleavy, John, ‘From Land League to Irish Democratic League: the story of a Lancashire Irish club’, Irish Studies in Britain 9, 1986:12-13.
    • ———. ‘Michael Davitt’s Lancashire Apprenticeship’, Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society 59, 2007.
    • ———. ‘Nationalism And Illuminated Addresses: An Irish Catholic Community In Victorian Lancashire’, The Local Historian 39(1), 2009: 38–47.
  • Liverpool
    • Beckingham, David. ‘The Irish Question and the Question of Drunkenness: Catholic Loyalty in Nineteenth-Century Liverpool’. Irish Geography 42(2), 2009: 125–44.
    • Belchem, John. ‘Liverpool in the year of revolution: the political and associational culture of the Irish immigrant community in 1848’ in Popular politics, riot and labour: essays in Liverpool history, 1790-1940, edited by John Belchem, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1992: 68-97
    • ———. ‘The Immigrant Alternative: Ethnic and Sectarian Mutuality among the Liverpool Irish during the Nineteenth Century’. In The Duty of Discontent: Essays for Dorothy Thompson, edited by John Belchem, Owen Ashton, Robert Fyson, and Stephen Roberts, London: Mansell, 1995: 231–50.
    • John Belchem, ‘Liverpool in 1848 : Image, Identity and Issues’, Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire & Cheshire 147, 1998: 1–26.
    • ———. ‘The Liverpool‐Irish Enclave’. Immigrants & Minorities 18(2–3), 1999: 128–146.
    • ———. ‘Ribbonism, Nationalism, and the Irish Pub’. In Merseypride: Essays in Liverpool Exceptionalism, 67–100. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2000
    • ———. ‘Priests, Publicans and the Irish Poor: Ethnic Enterprise and Migrant Networks in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Liverpool’. Immigrants & Minorities 23(2–3), 2005: 207–231.
    • ———. Irish, Catholic and Scouse: The History of the Liverpool-Irish, 1800-1939. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2007.
    • ———. ‘Hub and Diaspora: Liverpool and Transnational Labour’, Labour History Review 75(1), 2010: 20-29.
    • Bisceglia, Louis R. ‘The Threat of Violence : Irish Confederates and Chartists in Liverpool in 1848’, Irish Sword 14, 1981: 207–215.
    • Boyce, Frank. ‘From Victorian “Little Ireland” to Heritage Trail: Catholicism, Community and Change in Liverpool’s Docklands’. In The Irish in Victorian Britain: The Local Dimension, edited by Roger Swift and Sheridan Gilley, Dublin: Four Courts, 1999: 277–297.
    • Brady, L. W., T. P. O’Connor and the Liverpool Irish. London: Royal Historical Society, 1984
    • Busteed, Mervyn. ‘A Liverpool Shipping Agent and Irish Emigration in the 1850s: Some Newly Discovered Documents’. Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire & Cheshire 129, 2017: 145–161.
    • Davies, Sam. ‘“A Stormy Political Career”: P. J. Kelly and Irish Nationalist and Labour Politics in Liverpool, 1891-1936’. Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire 148, 1999: 147–189.
    • Davis, Carol. ‘Searching for Liverpool’s Famine Victims’, History Today 54(5), 2004: 7.
    • Dye, Ryan. ‘Catholic Protectionism or Irish Nationalism? Religion and Politics in Liverpool, 1829–1845’. Journal of British Studies 40(3), 2001: 357–390.
    • ———. ‘The Irish Flood : Famine, Philanthropy, and the Emergence of Duelling Liverpool Catholic Identities, 1845-1865’. Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire & Cheshire 150, 2003: 97–120.
    • Etchart, Joana. ‘Famine-Induced Emigration to British Towns, the Example of Liverpool’, in La Grande Famine En Irlande: 1845-1850, Histoire et Représentation d’un Désastre Humanitaire, edited by Yann Bévant. Rennes: Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2014: 89–102.
    • Gallagher, Tom. ‘A Tale of Two Cities : Communal Strife in Glasgow and Liverpool before 1914’, in The Irish in the Victorian City, ed. Roger Swift and Sheridan Gilley. London: Croom Helm, 1985: 106–29.
    • Gallman, J. Matthew. Receiving Erin’s Children: Philadelphia, Liverpool, and the Irish Famine Migration, 1845-1855. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2000.
    • Henders, Stephen K., ‘The Irish in Liverpool’, Irish Studies in Britain 13, 1988:8-9
    • Horner, Dan. ‘“If the Evil Now Growing around Us Be Not Staid”: Montreal and Liverpool Confront the Irish Famine Migration as a Transnational Crisis in Urban Governance’. Histoire Sociale / Social History 46(92), 2013: 349–66.
    • Hickman, Mary J. ‘Integration or Segregation? The Education of the Irish in Britain in Roman Catholic Voluntary‐aided Schools’. British Journal of Sociology of Education 14, no. 3 (1 January 1993): 285–300.
    • Jones, R.M. ‘The Liverpool Bread Riots, 1855.’ North West Labour History Society Bulletin 6, 1980
    • Kanya-Forstner, Martha. ‘Class, Gender and Religion : The Catholic Church and the Irish Poor in Victorian Liverpool’, in New Directions in Economic & Social History : Papers Presented at the ‘New Researchers’ Sessions of the Economic History Society Conference Held at Edinburgh, 31st March – 2nd April 1995 , edited by Ian Blanchard. Avonbridge: Newlees, 1995: 93–100.
    • ———. ‘The Politics of Survival : Irish Women in Outcast Liverpool, 1850-1890.’ (Ph.D., University of Liverpool, 1997)
    • ———. ‘Defining Womanhood : Irish Women and the Catholic Church in Victorian Liverpool’, in The Great Famine and beyond : Irish Migrants in Britain in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, edited by Donald M. MacRaild. Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 2000: 168–88.
    • Kearns, Gerry, and Paul Laxton. ‘Ethnic Groups as Public Health Hazards: The Famine Irish in Liverpool and Lazaretto Politics’. In The Politics of the Healthy Life: An International Perspective, edited by Esteban Rodríguez Ocaña, Sheffield: European Association for the History of Medicine and Health Publications, 2001: 13–40.
    • Kennedy, David, and Peter Kennedy. ‘Ambiguity, Complexity and Convergence: The Evolution of Liverpool’s Irish Football Clubs’. The International Journal of the History of Sport 24(7), 2007: 894–920.
    • Letford, Lynda & Colin G. Pooley, ‘Geographies of migration and religion: Irish women in mid-nineteenth-century Liverpool’ in The Irish world wide, vol. 4: Irish women and Irish migration, edited by Patrick O’Sullivan, Leicester: Leicester University Press: 89-112.
    • McCann, Jo. ‘Galway Marriages in Liverpool’, Galway Roots [Journal of the Galway Family History Society] 4, 1996: 127–29.
    • Frank Neal, ‘Liverpool, the Irish Steamship Companies and the Famine Irish’, Immigrants & Minorities 5(1), 1986: 28–61.
    • ———. Sectarian Violence: The Liverpool Experience, 1819-1914: An Aspect of Anglo-Irish History. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1988.
    • ———. ‘A Criminal Profile of the Liverpool Irish’. Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire 140, 1991: 161–200.
    • ———. ‘Black ’47: Liverpool and the Irish famine’ in The hungry stream: essays on emigration and famine, edited by E. Margaret Crawford, Belfast: Institute of Irish Studies, 1997: 123-36.
    • O’Connell, Bernard, ‘Irish nationalism in Liverpool’, Éire-Ireland 10(1), 1975: 24-37.
    • Ó Riabhaigh, Micheál. ‘Liverpool and the Irish Famine 1845-1985’, Irish Studies in Britain 8, 1985: 15–16.
    • O’Sullivan, Patrick. Irish Women and Irish Migration. London: Leicester University Press, 1995.
    • Pooley, Colin G., ‘The Residential Segregation of Migrant Communities in Mid-Victorian Liverpool’, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 2(3), 1977: 364–82.
    • ———. ‘The Irish in Liverpool circa 1850-1940’ in Ethnic identity in urban Europe, edited by Max Engman, New York: NYU Press, 1992:71-97.
    • ———. ‘Migrants and the Media in Nineteenth-Century Liverpool’, Local Population Studies 92, 2014:24-37.
    • Pratt, David, ‘Mary Cannovan: life as a pre-famine Irish immigrant in Liverpool’, Genealogists’ Magazine 25, 1995:153-4.
    • Scally, Robert. ‘Liverpool ships and the Irish emigrants in the age of sail.’ Journal of Social History 17(1), 1983:5-30
    • Scott, Caroline L. ‘A Comparative Re-Examination of Anglo-Irish Relations in Nineteenth-Century Manchester, Liverpool and Newcastle-upon-Tyne.’ (PhD, Durham, University of Durham, 1998)
  • Manchester
    • Busteed, Mervyn. ‘“The Most Horrible Spot”? The Legend of Manchester’s Little Ireland’. Irish Studies Review 4, no. 13 (1995): 12–20.
    • ———. ‘Irish Migrant Responses to Urban Life in Early Nineteenth-Century Manchester’. The Geographical Journal 162(2), 1996: 139–153.
    • ———. ‘“Persons Who Are in a Species of Exile” : Varieties of Irishness amongst Irish Migrants in Mid-Nineteenth Century Manchester’, in Space & Place: The Geographies of Literature, edited by Glenda Norquay and Gerry Smyth. Liverpool: Liverpool John Moores University Press, 1997: 57-75
    • ———. ‘The Irish in Nineteenth-Century Manchester’, Irish Studies Review 5(18), 1997
    • Jo McCann, ‘Galway Marriages in Liverpool’, Galway Roots [Journal of the Galway Family History Society] 4 (1996): 127–29.: 8–13.
    • ———. ‘Songs in a Strange Land—Ambiguities of Identity amongst Irish Migrants in Mid-Victorian Manchester’. Political Geography 17, no. 6 (1998): 627–65.
    • ———. ‘Little Islands of Erin: Irish Settlement and Identity in Mid‐nineteenth‐century Manchester’. Immigrants & Minorities 18(2), 1999: 94–127.
    • ———. ‘Irish Migration and Settlement in Early Nineteenth Century Manchester, with Special Reference to the Angel Meadow District in 1851’. Irish Geography 27(1), 1999: 1–13.
    • ———. ‘Research Report on Irish Nationalist Processions in Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century Manchester’, North West Geography 1(2), 2001: 35–38.
    • ———. ‘“I Shall Never Return to Hibernia’s Bowers”: Irish Migrant Identities in Early Victorian Manchester’. North West Geographer 2(2), 2001: 21–34.
    • ———. Patterns of Irishness in Nineteenth Century Manchester. Manchester: Manchester Statistical Society, 2001.
    • ———. ‘Identities in Transition : Irish Migrant Outlooks in Mid-Victorian Manchester’ in Problems and Perspectives in Irish History since 1800: Essays in Honour of Patrick Buckland, edited by P. Buckland and D. G. Boyce, Dublin: Four Courts, 2004.
    • ———. ‘Parading the Green–Procession as Subaltern Resistance in Manchester in 1867’. Political Geography 24(8), 2005: 903–933.
    • ———. ‘The Manchester Martyrs: A Victorian Melodrama’, History Ireland 16(6), 2008: 35–37.
    • ———. ‘Resistance and Respectability: Dilemmas of Irish Migrant Politics in Victorian Britain’. Immigrants & Minorities 27, no. 2–3 (2009): 178–93.
    • ———. ‘“Plentiful Libations of Whisky, Perfervid Irish Oratory and Some Religious Sentiment”: Celebrating St Patrick’s Day in Manchester, 1825-1922’. In Ireland: Revolution and Evolution, edited by John R. Strachan and Alison O’Malley-Younger, New York: Peter Lang, 2009:81–100.
    • ———. The Irish in Manchester c.1750-1921: Resistance, Adaptation and Identity. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015.
    • ——— and Robert Hodgson. ‘Coping with Urbanisation: The Irish in Early Manchester’ in The Urban Experience – A People-Environment Perspective (Proceedings 13th International Conference of the IAPS) edited by S. J. Neary, M. S. Symes, and F. E. Brown. Manchester: E. & F.N. Spon, 1994.
    • ———, ———, and Thomas Kennedy. The Myth and Reality of Irish Migrants in Mid-Nineteenth Century Manchester: A Preliminary Study. Leicester: Leicester University Press, 1992.
    • Cass, Eddie. ‘The Printing History of The Peace Egg Chapbooks’, in Book Trade Connections from the Seventeenth to the Twentieth Centuries, Print Networks, 9, edited by John Hinks and Catherin Armstrong. London: British Library, 2008: 161–79.
    • Doughty, Jack. The Manchester Outrage : A Fenian Tragedy. Oldham: Jade, 2001.
    • Duffy, Pat. ‘Carrying the Hod: Irish Immigrant Labour in the Manchester Building Trades’, North-West Labour History 16, 1992: 36–40.
    • Fielding, Steven. ‘The Irish Catholics of Manchester and Salford : Aspects of Their Religious and Political History, 1890-1939’. PhD, University of Warwick, 1988.
    • ———. ‘Irish Politics in Manchester 1890-1914’, International Review of Social History 33(3), 1988: 261–284.
    • ———. ‘A Separate Culture? Irish Catholics in Working-Class Manchester and Salford, C1890-1939’, in Workers’ Worlds: Cultures and Communities in Manchester and Salford, 1880-1939, edited by Steven Fielding and Andrew Davies. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1992: 23–48.
    • ———. Class and Ethnicity: Irish Catholics in England, 1880-1939. Buckingham: Open University Press, 1993.
    • George, A. D. & S. Clark, ‘Little Ireland: Manchester’, Industrial Archaeology, 14(1), 1979: 36-40
    • Hayton, Sandra. ‘The Archetypal Irish Cellar Dweller’. Manchester Region History Review 12, 1998: 66–77.
    • Herbert, Michael. The Wearing of the Green : A Political History of the Irish in Manchester. London: Irish in Britain Representation Group, 2001.
    • McBride, Lawrence W. The Reynolds Letters: An Irish Emigrant Family in Late Victorian Manchester. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing, LLC., 1999.
    • Neal, Frank. ‘The Manchester Origins of The English Orange Order’. Manchester Region History Review 4(2), 1990
    • O’Neill, Joseph, ‘The Irish in Manchester in the second half of the nineteenth century’, Irish Roots 4, 1998: 28-29.
    • ———.
    • The Manchester Martyrs (Cork: Mercier Press, 2012).
    • Poovey, Mary. ‘Curing the ‘Social Body’ in 1832: James Phillips Kay and the Irish in Manchester’. Gender & History 5(2), 1993: 196–211 [NB see similar in Poovey, Making A Social Body]
    • Scott, Caroline L. ‘A Comparative Re-Examination of Anglo-Irish Relations in Nineteenth-Century Manchester, Liverpool and Newcastle-upon-Tyne.’ (PhD, Durham, University of Durham, 1998).
    • Smith, Neil. ‘The Irish Middle-Class in Nineteenth-Century Manchester’ (PhD, Liverpool, University of Liverpool, 2020).
    • ———, and Mervyn Austen Busteed, ‘A Diasporic Life – the Emergence of an Irish Middle Class in Nineteenth-Century Manchester’, in Irish Elites in the Nineteenth Century, edited by Ciaran O’Neill. Nineteenth-Century Ireland Series, 15 (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013: 197–208.
    • Werly, John M. ‘The Irish in Manchester, 1832-49’. Irish Historical Studies ———. ‘A Separate Culture? Irish Catholics in Working-Class Manchester and Salford, C1890-1939’, in Workers’ Worlds: Cultures and Communities in Manchester and Salford, 1880-1939, edited by Steven Fielding and Andrew Davies. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1992: 23–48.
    • 18(71), 1973: 345–58.
    • White, John. Irish Devils : The Official Story of Manchester United and the Irish (London: Simon & Schuster, 2012).
  • Ormskirk
    • Coney, Audrey P. ‘Mid Nineteenth-Century Ormskirk: Disease, Overcrowding and the Irish in a Lancashire Market Town’. Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire 139, 1989: 83–111.
  • Preston
    • Susanne S. Cammack, ‘“You Have Made Him What He Is” : Irish Laborers and the Preston Strike in Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South’, New Hibernia Review 20(4), 2016: 113–127
    • Hepworth, Jack. ‘Between Isolation and Integration: Religion, Politics, and the Catholic Irish in Preston, C.1829-1868’. Immigrants & Minorities forthcoming, 2020: 1–28.
    • Smith, Tom, ‘Turning the century: Catholics decadent and Prestonian’ in Turning the last century: essays on English Catholicism circa 1900, edited by J. A. Hilton, Tom Smith, John Davies and John McDermott. Wigan: North West Catholic History Society, 2003: 10-26.
  • Rochdale
    • Sandra Hayton, The Irish Cellar Dwellers: Salford, Stockport and Rochdale, 1861-71, Occasional Papers in Politics and Contemporary History, 28. Salford: University of Salford, Department of Politics and Contemporary History, 1992.
  • Salford

Lincolnshire

  • Barber, Sarah. ‘Irish Migrant Agricultural Labourers in Nineteenth Century Lincolnshire’, Saothar: Journal of the Irish Labour History Society 8, 1982: 10–22.

London

  • Beaumont, J. ‘Irish Names in a London Cemetery: Is It Possible to Identify Irish Immigration in Nineteenth-Century Lukin Street?’ In Food and Drink in Archaeology 2: Volume 2, edited by Naomi Sykes and Claire Newton, Totnes: Prospect Books, 2009: 21–28.
  • Beaumont, Julia, Jonny Geber, Natasha Powers, Andrew Wilson, Julia Lee‐Thorp and Janet Montgomery. ‘Victims and survivors: Stable isotopes used to identify migrants from the Great Irish Famine to 19th century London’, American Journal of Physical Anthropology 150(1), 2013: 87-98
  • Bhavsar, V., and D. Bhugra. ‘Bethlem’s Irish: Migration and Distress in Nineteenth-Century London’. History of Psychiatry 20(78) Pt 2, 2009: 184–98.
  • Dahl, Elizabeth R. ‘Irish Female Criminality in Nineteenth Century London’. MA, University of Central Oklahoma, 2018.
  • D’Arcy, Fergus A., ‘The London Irish and the Irish in Britain’, Saothar: Journal of the Irish Labour History Society 8, 58-63.
  • Davis, Jennifer. ‘Jennings’ Buildings and the Royal Borough: The Construction of the Underclass in Mid-Victorian England’, in Metropolis – London : Histories and Representations since 1800, edited by David Feldman and Gareth Stedman Jones, London: Routledge, 1989: 11–39
  • ———. ‘From “Rookeries” to “Communities”: Race, Poverty and Policing in London, 1850–1985’. History Workshop Journal 27(1), 1989: 66–85.
  • Farrell, J. ‘The Irish in Hammersmith  and Fulham in 1851’. The Local Historian 29(2), 1999: 66–95.
  • Feheney, J. M. ‘Delinquency among Irish Catholic Children in Victorian London’. Irish Historical Studies 23(92), 1983: 319–29.
  • ———. ‘The London Catholic ragged school: an experiment for Irish destitute children’, Archivium Hibernicum 39, 1984:32-44.
  • Foster, Robert Fitzroy, and Fintan Cullen. ‘Conquering England’: Ireland in Victorian London. London: National Portrait Gallery, 2005.
  • Gage, John. ‘The Rise and fall of St. Giles Rookery: An Account of the Notorious Slums in the parish of St. Giles’. Camden History Review 12, 1984
  • Gilley, Sheridan. ‘The Roman Catholic Mission to the Irish in London, 1840-1860’. Recusant History 10(2), 1969: 124.
  • ———. ‘Protestant London, No-Popery and the Irish Poor, 1830–60’. British Catholic History 10(4), 1970: 210–230.
  • ———. ‘Heretic London, Holy Poverty, and the Irish Poor, 1830–1870’. The Downside Review 89, 1971: 64–89.
  • ———. ‘Protestant London, No Popery and the Irish Poor: II (1850—1860)’. British Catholic History 11(1), 1971: 21–46.
  • ———. ‘Papists, Protestants and the Irish in London, 1835-70’, in Popular Belief and Practice, edited by G. J. Cuming and Derek Baker, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1971: 259–266
  • ———.‘English Catholic charity and the Irish poor in London (1700-1870)’, Recusant History 11, 1972: 179-195.
  • ———.‘The Garibaldi Riots of 1862’. The Historical Journal, 16(4), 1973: 697–732.
  • ———. ‘Catholic Faith of the Irish Slums: London, 1840-70’, in The Victorian City : Images and Realities, edited by H. J. Dyos and Michael Wolff, London: Routledge, 1978: 837–583.
  • Gleeson, Delia. ‘The Backwater: Irish Faith in a London Slum’. The Irish Monthly 60(708), 1932: 373–380.
  • Harkin, Frances. ‘“Where Would We Be without the GAA?”: Gaelic Games and Irishness in London’. Irish Studies Review 26(1), 2018: 55–66.
  • Hickman, Mary J. ‘Reflecting on Gender and Generation Differences in Celebrating St Patrick’s Day in London’, in Women and Irish Diaspora Identities: Theories, Concepts and New Perspectives, edited by D. A. J. Macpherson and Mary J. Hickman. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2014: 112–129
  • Kerrigan, Colm. ‘Temperance and the Irish in West Ham’. Essex Journal 12(1), 1982.
  • ———. ‘Father Matthew and Teetotalism in London 1843’. London Journal, 11(2) 1985: 107-114
  • King, Peter. ‘Ethnicity, Prejudice, and Justice: The Treatment of the Irish at the Old Bailey, 1750-1825’. Journal of British Studies 52(2), 2013: 390–414.
  • Kirkland, Richard. ‘Reading the Rookery: The Social Meaning of an Irish Slum in Nineteenth-Century London’. New Hibernia Review 16(1), 2012: 16–30.
  • ———. ‘Creating Irish London: Modes of Performative Irishness in London, 1870-1890’. Nordic Irish Studies 13(2), 2014: 137–154.
  • ———. ‘“A Secret, Melodramatic Sort of Conspiracy”: The Disreputable Legacies of Fenian Violence in Nineteenth-Century London’. The London Journal 45(1), 2020: 39–52.
  • Lees, Lynn Hollen. ‘Patterns of Lower Class Life: Irish Slum Communities in Nineteenth Century London’, in Nineteenth-Century Cities: Essays in the New Urban History, edited by S. Thernstrom and Richard Sennett, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1969.
  • ———. Exiles of Erin: Irish Migrants in Victorian London. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1979.
  • Maguire, Maria. The Irish in Ealing: an invisible community. London: Brent Irish Advisory Service, 1989
  • Mark, Lara. ‘‘The Luckless Waifs and Strays of Humanity”: Irish and Jewish Immigrant Unwed Mothers in London, 1870–1939’. Twentieth Century British History 3(2), 1992: 113–137.
  • Moore, Stephen, and Paul Darby. ‘Gaelic Games, Irish Nationalist Politics and the Irish Diaspora in London, 1895–1915’. Sport in History 31(3), 2011: 257–282
  • O’Sullivan, Patrick. Irish Women and Irish Migration. London: Leicester University Press, 1995.
  • Regan-Lefebvre, Jennifer. ‘Imperial Politics and the London Irish’. In Ireland in an Imperial World: Citizenship, Opportunism, and Subversion, edited by Timothy G. McMahon, Michael de Nie, and Paul Townend (Cambridge Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies Series). London: Palgrave Macmillan UK, 2017: 111–130
  • Scholl, Lesa. ‘Irish Migration to London During the c.1845-52 Famine: Henry Mayhew’s Representation in London Labour and the London Poor’. BRANCH: Britain, Representation and Nineteenth-Century History. Accessed 16 August 2018.
  • Seleski, Patty, ‘Identity, immigration, and the state: Irish immigrants and English settlement in London, 1790-1840’, in Singular continuities: tradition, nostalgia, and identity in modern British culture, edited by George K. Behlmer & Fred Marc Leventhal. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press: 11-27.
  • Weindling, Dick, and Marianne Colloms. ‘The Irish in Kilburn: Myth and Reality’. Local Historian 32(2), 2002: 118–131.

Leicestershire

  • N. J. E. Danaher, ‘The Irish in Leicester, c.1841 to c.1891 : A Study of a Minority Community in the East Midlands’ (PhD, London, University of North London, 1999).
  • O’Connor, Henrietta, ‘The Irish in Leicester: an invisible community?’ in Migration processes and ethnic divisions, edited by N.D. Jewson. Leicester: The Centre for Urban History/The Ethnic Research Centre, 1995: 47-65.

Northumberland

  • Allen, Joan. ‘“High Days and Holy Days”: St Patrick’s Day in the North East of England, c.1850–1900’. In Faith of Our Fathers: Popular Culture and Belief in Post-Reformation England, Ireland and Wales, edited by Richard C. Allen and Joan Allen, 137–156. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publisher, 2009.
  • ——— & Richard C. Allen, ‘Competing identities: Irish and Welsh migration and the North East of England, 1851-1980’ in Regional identities in north-east England, 1300-2000, edited by Adrian Green & Anthony James Pollard. Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2007: 133-160
  • Burnett, John A. and Donald M. MacRaild, ‘The Irish and Scots on Tyneside’, in Northumbria: History and Identity 547-2000, edited by Robert Colls. Chichester: Phillimore, 2007: 178–93.
  • Bush, Jonathan. “Papists” and Prejudice: Popular Anti-Catholicism and Anglo-Irish Conflict in the North East of England, 1845-70. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013.
  • Newcastle-upon-Tyne/Tyneside
    • Allen, Joan. Joseph Cowen and Popular Radicalism on Tyneside, 1829-1900. Monmouth: Merlin, 2007.
    • Cooter, Roger. When Paddy Met Geordie : The Irish in County Durham and Newcastle, 1840-1880 (Sunderland: University of Sunderland Press, 2005).
    • Duffy, Godfrey, ‘The Famine Irish in Newcastle & Co Durham: Sources for Genealogical Research’, Northern Catholic History 42, 59-65.
    • Jackson, Daniel M. ‘Garibaldi or the Pope : Newcastle’s Irish Riot of 1861’. North East History 34, 2001: 49–82.
    • MacDermott, T.P. ‘Irish Workers on Tyneside in the 19th Century’. In Essays in Tyneside Labour History, edited by Norman McCord, 154–177. Newcastle: Newcastle-upon-Tyne Polytechnic, Department of Humanities, 1977.
    • Neal, Frank. ‘The Foundations of the Irish Settlement in Newcastle upon Tyne: The Evidence in the 1851 Census’. Immigrants & Minorities 18(2–3), 1999: 71–93.
    • Scott, Caroline L. ‘A Comparative Re-Examination of Anglo-Irish Relations in Nineteenth-Century Manchester, Liverpool and Newcastle-upon-Tyne.’ (PhD, Durham, University of Durham, 1998).
    • Sutcliffe, Marcella Pellegrino. ‘Negotiating the “Garibaldi Moment” in Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1854–1861)’. Modern Italy 15(2), 2010: 129–144.

Nottinghamshire

Shropshire

  • R. S. Kinsey, ‘Irish in Shropshire’, Notes and Queries 196, 1951: 457.

Somerset

  • Bath
    • Davis, Graham. ‘Beyond the Georgian Facade: The Avon Street District of Bath’, in Slums, edited by Martin Gaskell. Leicester: Leicester University Press, 1990: 144–185
    • ———.‘Social Decline and Slum Conditions: Irish Migrants in Bath’s History’. Bath History 8, 2000: 134.
    • Brian Griffin, ‘Anti-Catholicism in Bath from 1820 to 1870’, Recusant History 31(4), 2013: 593–611.
  • Bristol

Staffordshire

  • Stafford
    • John Herson, ‘Irish Migration and Settlement in Victorian Britain: A Small-Town Perspective’, in The Irish in Britain, 1815-1939, edited by Roger Swift and Sheridan Gilley, Savage, MD: Barnes & Noble Books, 1989: 84–103
    • ———. ‘Migration, “community” or Integration? Irish Families in Victorian Stafford’, in The Irish in Victorian Britain: The Local Dimension, edited by Roger Swift and Sheridan Gilley. Dublin: Four Courts, 1999: 158–189
    • ———. ‘Family History and Memory in Irish Immigrant Families’, in Histories and Memories: Migrants and Their History in Britain, edited by Panikos Panayi and Kathy Burrell. London: I.B.Tauris, 2006: 211–231
    • ———. Divergent Paths: Family Histories of Irish Emigrants in Britain 1820-1920. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015
  • Wolverhampton
    • Hobbs, Alison. ‘The Irish of Caribee Island: Wolverhampton’s Irish District,1851-1871’. MPhil, University of Wolverhampton, 2003.
    • Mark Shaw, ‘Residential Patterns and Social Change : Wolverhampton, 1851-1871’ (Ph.D., Birmingham, University of Birmingham, 1977)
    • ———. ‘The Ecology of Social Change: Wolverhampton 1851-71’, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 2(3), 1977: 332–348;
    • ———. ‘Reconciling Social and Physical Space: Wolverhampton 1871’, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 4(2), 1979: 192–213.
    • ———. ‘Individual Behaviour and Social Change: The Irish in Victorian Wolverhampton’. West Midlands Studies 14, 1981.
    • Swift, Roger. ‘Crime and Ethnicity: The Irish in Early Victorian Wolverhampton’. West Midlands Studies 13, 1980: 1–5.
    • ———. ‘Anti-Catholicism and Irish Disturbances: Public Order in Mid-Victorian Wolverhampton’. Midland History 9(1), 1984: 87–108.
    • ———. ‘“Another Stafford Street Row”: Law, Order and the Irish Presence in Mid-Victorian Wolverhampton’. In The Irish in the Victorian City, edited by Roger Swift and Sheridan Gilley, 179–206. London: Croom Helm, 1985.
    • ———. Crime and Society in Wolverhampton 1815-1860. Wolverhampton: Wolverhampton Public Libraries, 1987.
    • ———. ‘The English Urban Magistracy and the Administration of Justice during the Early Nineteenth Century: Wolverhampton 1815–1860’. Midland History 17(1), 1992: 75–92.

Warwickshire

  • Birmingham
    • Champ, Judith F. ‘The Demographic Impact of Irish Immigration on Birmingham Catholicism 1800-1850’. Studies in Church History 25, 1989: 233–242.
    • Chinn, Carl. ‘“Sturdy Catholic Emigrants”: The Irish in Early Victorian Birmingham’. In The Irish in Victorian Britain: The Local Dimension, edited by Roger Swift and Sheridan Gilley. Dublin: Four Courts, 1999: 52–74
    • ———. Birmingham Irish: Making Our Mark. Birmingham: Birmingham Library Services, 2003.
    • Davis, Patsy. ‘Green Ribbons: The Irish in Birmingham in the 1860s, a Study of Housing, Work and Policing’. MPhil, University of Birmingham, 2003.
    • ———. ‘Birmingham’s Irish Community and the Murphy Riots of 1867’. Midland History 31(1), 2006: 37–66.
    • Moran, James. Irish Birmingham: A History. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2010.
    • Peach, Alexander. ‘Poverty, Religion and Prejudice in Nineteenth Century Britain : The Catholic Irish in Birmingham 1800-c.1880’. PhD, De Montfort University, 2000
    • Ziesler, Kaja Irene. ‘The Irish in Birmingham 1830-1970’. PhD, University of Birmingham, 1989.
  • Coventry
    • Mulkern, Paul. ‘Irish Immigrants and Public Disorder In Coventry, 1845-1875’. Midland History 21(1), 1996: 119–35.
    • Prendergast, Thomas Joseph. ‘The Irish in Nineteenth-Century Coventry’ (PhD, Belfast, Ulster University, 2019).

Yorkshire

  • Kennally, Helen. ‘North Tipperary Famine Orphans “Exported” to Yorkshire’, Tipperary Historical Journal, 1999: 25–37.
  • Maguire, Andrew. ‘Irish Diaspora Politics: The West Riding of Yorkshire, 1879-1886’. Studi Irlandesi 9, 2019: 205–28.
  • Bradford
    • Brophy, Ann, ‘The Irish in Bradford 1830-1920: parallels with today’s multi-ethnic society’, Irish Studies in Britain 5, 1984: 9-10.
    • Richardson, Clem. ‘The Irish in Victorian Bradford’. The Bradford Antiquary 4, 1976: 294–316.
  • Huddersfield
  • Hull
    • Gibbons, Jo, ‘Irish immigration into mid-nineteenth-century Hull’ in Keeping faith: 700 years of Catholic life in Hull, edited by John Markham. Beverley: Highgate Publications: 49-62.
    • Young, Jim, ‘The Irish in Hull’, Irish Studies in Britain 11, 1987: 12-13.
  • Knaresborough
    • Patmore, J. A. ‘A Navvy Gang of 1851’, The Journal of Transport History 5(3), 1962: 182–189
  • Leeds
    • Dillon, T. ‘The Irish in Leeds 1851-1861’. Thoresby Society Publications Miscellany 54(1), 1974: 1–18.
    • Freeman, Pauline E., ‘Erin’s exiles – the Irish in Leeds’ in Catholicism in Leeds: a community of faith 1794-1994, edited by Robert E. Finnigan & George T. Bradley. Leeds: Leeds Diocesan Archives, 1994: 71-92.
    • Kennally, Danny & Helen Kennally, ‘From Roscrea to Leeds: an emigrant community’, Tipperary Historical Journal 13, 1992: 122-131.
    • Kennally, Helen. ‘The Irish in Leeds 1851-1861’. Thoresby Society Publications Miscellany 2nd Series 20, 2010: 1–18.
  • Middlesbrough
    • Chase, Malcolm. ‘The Teesside Irish in the Nineteenth Century’. Cleveland History 69, 1995: 3–23.
  • York
    • Finnegan, Frances. Poverty and Prejudice: A Study of Irish Immigrants in York 1840-1875. Cork: Cork University Press, 1982.
    • ———. ‘The Irish in York’, in The Irish in the Victorian City, edited by Roger Swift and Sheridan Gilley. London: Croom Helm, 1985: 59–84

Scotland

  • Aspinwall, Bernard, ‘Popery in Scotland: Image and Reality, 1820-1920’, Records of the Scottish Church History Society 22, 1986: 235-257.
  • ———. ‘Scots and Irish clergy ministering to immigrants, 1830-1878’, Innes Review 47(1), 1996: 45-68.
  • ———. ‘A Long Journey : The Irish in Scotland’, in The Irish World Wide. Vol. 5 : Religion and Identity, ed. Patrick O’Sullivan (London and New York: Leicester University Press, 1996), 146–82.
  • ———. ‘The Irish abroad: Michael Condon in Scotland, 1845-1878’ in The Churches, Ireland and the Irish, edited by William J. Sheils & Diana Wood. Oxford: Ecclesiastical History Society, 1997: 279-297.
  • ———. ‘A long journey: the Irish in Scotland’ in The Irish world wide. Vol. 5: Religion and identity edited by Patrick O’Sullivan. London: Bloomsbury, 1998: 146-182.
  • ———. ‘The Catholic Minority Experience in Scotland: the Poorhouse View, 1850-1914’, Immigrants & Minorities, 31(2), 2013: 127-145.
  • Bradley, Joseph M., ‘Wearing the green: a history of nationalist demonstrations among the diaspora in Scotland’ in The Irish parading tradition: following the drum, edited by T.G. Fraser. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2000: 111-128.
  • ———. ‘Gaelic sport, soccer and Irishness in Scotland’, Sport in Society, 10(3), 2007: 439-456.
  • Canning, Bernard. ‘A Notable Limerick Priest in Scotland’, North Munster Antiquarian Journal 42, 2002: 180.
  • Collins, Brenda, ‘The origins of Irish immigration to Scotland in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries’ in Irish immigrants and Scottish society in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, edited by Thomas M. Devine. Edinburgh: John Donald, 2001
  • Gallagher, Tom. ‘The Catholic Irish in Scotland : In Search of Identity’, in Irish Immigrants and Scottish Society in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (Edinburgh: John Donald, 1991), 19–43.
  • ———. ‘Irish Catholics in Scotland: from exile politics to integration’ in A century of northern life: the Irish News and 100 years of Ulster history, 1890s-1990s, edited by Éamon Phoenix. Belfast: Ulster Historical Foundation, 1995: 196-200.
  • ———. ‘The Catholic Irish in Scotland: in search of identity’ in Irish immigrants and Scottish society in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, edited by Thomas M. Devine. Edinburgh: John Donald, 2001:19-43.
  • Holmes, Heather. ‘Dr John McVail and the Improvement of the Housing of the Irish Migratory Potato Harvesters in Scotland, 1897-c.1913’, Ulster Folklife 44 (1998): 2–16.
  • ———. ‘Remembering their history: Memories of Irish migratory agricultural workers in Scotland’, Human Affairs 12(2), 2002: 139-52.
  • ———. ‘Constructing Identities of the Irish Migratory Potato Workers in Scotland’, Folk Life 43, 2005: 32–55.
  • Eric P. Kaufmann, ‘The Orange Order in Scotland since 1860 : A Social Analysis’, in New Perspectives on the Irish in Scotland, edited by Martin J. Mitchell. Edinburgh: John Donald, 2008: 159–90.
  • Kehoe, S. Karly, ‘Border crossings: being Irish in nineteenth-century Scotland and Canada’ in Women and Irish diaspora identities: theories, concepts and new perspectives, edited by D.A.J. MacPherson & Mary J. Hickman. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2014: 152-167.
  • ———. Creating a Scottish Church: Catholicism, Gender and Ethnicity in Nineteenth-Century Scotland, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2010
  • McCaffrey, John F. ‘Roman Catholics in Scotland in the 19th and 20th Centuries’, Records of the Scottish Church History Society 21 (1983): 275–300.
  • ———. ‘Irish Issues in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century : Radicalism in a Scottish Context?’, in Irish Immigrants and Scottish Society in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, ed. Thomas Martin Devine (Edinburgh: John Donald, 1991), 116–41.
  • McFarland, Elaine W. ‘A Reality and yet Impalpable : The Fenian Panic in Mid-Victorian Scotland’, Scottish Historical Review 77, 1998: 199–223.
  • Ó Catháin, Máirtín. ‘Fenian Dynamite: Dissident Irish Republicans in Late Nineteenth-Century Scotland’, in Ireland Abroad: Politics and Professions in the Nineteenth Century, ed. Oonagh Walsh (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2003), 160–71.
  • ———. ‘Bullet Moulders and Blackthorn Men: A Comparative Study of Irish Nationalist Secret Society Culture in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Scotland and Ulster’, in Ireland and Scotland : Order and Disorder, 1600-2000, ed. R.J. Morris and Liam Kennedy (Edinburgh: John Donald, 2005), 153–61.
  • ———. Irish Republicanism in Scotland, 1858-1916, The Irish Abroad. Dublin: Four Courts, 2007.
  • Reilly, Patrick. ‘You Are the People, Who Are We? Reflecting on the Irish-Catholic Contribution to Scottish Society’, in Out of the Ghetto? The Catholic Community in Modern Scotland edited by Raymond Boyle and Peter Lynch. Edinburgh: John Donald, 1998: 142–62.
  • Vaughan, Geraldine. ‘The Irish Famine in a Scottish Perspective 1845-1851’, Cahiers du MIMMOC 12, 2015.
  • Walker, Graham S., ‘The Protestant Irish in Scotland’ in Irish immigrants and Scottish society in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, edited by Thomas M. Devine. Edinburgh: John Donald, 2001: 44-66.
  • Walker, W.M. ‘Irish Immigrants in Scotland: their priests, politics and parochial life’, (1972) The Historical Journal 15(4):649-667
  • Wood, Ian S. ‘Irish Nationalism and Radical Politics in Scotland, 1880-1906’, Scottish Labour History 9 (1975): 21–38.
  • ———.‘Irish Immigrants and Scottish Radicalism 1880-1906’, in Essays in Scottish Labour History: A Tribute to W.H. Marwick, ed. Ian MacDougall (Edinburgh: Donald, 1978), 65–89.
  • ———. ‘John Wheatley, the Irish and the Labour Movement in Scotland’, Innes Review 31, 1980:71-85.
  • Young, James D. ‘The Irish Immigrants’ Contribution to Scottish Socialism 1880-1926’, Saothar: Journal of the Irish Labour History Society 13, 1988: 89–98.
  • Western Scotland
    • Aspinwall, Bernard. ‘The Formation of the Catholic Community in the West of Scotland’, Innes Review 33, 1982: 44–57.
    • McDowell, Matthew, ‘Football, Migration and Industrial Patronage in the West of Scotland, c.1870-1900’, Sport in History 32(3), 2012: 405-425.
    • Mitchell, Martin J. ‘In General, They Do Not Answer Well? : Irish Priests in the Western Lowlands of Scotland, 1838-50’, in Ireland Abroad : Politics and Professions in the Nineteenth Century, ed. Oonagh Walsh, Nineteenth-Century Ireland Series, 6 (Dublin: Four Courts, 2003), 147–59.
    • ———. The Irish in the West of Scotland, 1797-1848 : Trade Unions, Strikes and Political Movements (Edinburgh: John Donald, 1998).
    • ———. ‘The Catholic Irish and Chartism in the West of Scotland’, in These Fissured Isles : Ireland, Scotland and the Making of Modern Britain 1798-1848, ed. Terry Brotherstone, Anna Clark, and Kevin Whelan. Edinburgh: John Donald, 2006: 178–94.
    • ———. ‘Irish Catholics in the West of Scotland in the Nineteenth Century : Despised by Scottish Workers and Controlled by the Church?’, in New Perspectives on the Irish in Scotland, edited by Martin J. Mitchell. Edinburgh: John Donald, 2008: 1–19.
    • Vaughan, Geraldine. The ‘local’ Irish in the West of Scotland 1851-1921. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
  • Armadale
    • Sybil Cavanagh, Armadale: The Irish Shearers’ Invasion. Blackburn: West Lothian Local History Library, 2010.
  • Ayrshire
    • Heather Holmes, Tattie Howkers : Irish Potato Workers in Ayrshire, Ayrshire Monographs, 31 (Ayr: Ayrshire Archaeological & Natural History Society, 2005).
  • Campbeltown
    • Angus Martin, ‘Nineteenth Century County Antrim Immigrant Families in the Burgh of Campbeltown’, The Glynns: Journal of the Glens of Antrim Historical Society 13 (1985): 26–31.
  • Dumbartonshire
  • Dundee
    • Collins, B.M. ‘Irish Emigration to Dundee and Paisley during the First Half of the Nineteenth Century’. In Irish Population, Economy, and Society: Essays in Honour of the Late K.H. Connell, edited by Kenneth Hugh Connell and J.M. Goldstrom. Clarendon Press, 1981: 192–212
    • Sukaina Haidar, ‘A Notable Absence of Hostility? : Attitudes towards the Irish in Dundee, 1865-1925’, History Studies: University of Limerick History Society Journal 8 (2007): 93–110.
    • McCready, Richard B. ‘Irish Catholicism and Nationalism in Scotland: The Dundee Experience, 1850–1922’. Irish Studies Review 6(3), 1998: 245–252
    • ———. ‘St. Patrick’s Day in Dundee, c.1850–1900: A Contested Irish Institution in a Scottish Context’. In Ireland and Scotland in the Nineteenth Century, edited by Frank Ferguson and James Richard Redmond McConnel. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2009: 134–146
    • Whelehan, Niall, ‘Saving Ireland in Juteopolis: Gender, Class and Diaspora in the Irish Ladies’ Land League ‘. History Workshop Journal 90, 2020:74-95
  • Edinburgh
    • Armstrong, Allan. The Ghost of James Connolly : James Connolly and Edinburgh’s New Trade Union, Independent Labour and Socialist Movements (1890-96). Edinburgh: Intfrobel Publications, 2013
    • Aspinwall, Bernard & John F. McCaffrey, ‘A comparative view of the Irish in Edinburgh in the 19thcentury’ in The Irish in the Victorian city(London), edited by Roger Swift & Sheridan Gilley. London: Croom Helm, 1985: 130-157.
  • Galloway
    • Meredith, Ian. ‘Irish Episcopalians in the Scottish Episcopal Diocese of Glasgow and Galloway during the Nineteenth Century’. Immigrants & Minorities 27(2–3), 2009: 248–278.
  • Glasgow/Clydeside
    • Aspinwall, Bernard, ‘The Catholic Irish and wealth in Glasgow’ in Thomas M. Devine (ed), Irish immigrants and Scottish society in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, edited by Thomas M. Devine. Edinburgh: John Donald, 2001: 91-115.
    • Bradley, Joseph M., ‘Celtic Football Club and the Irish in Scotland’ in Celtic minded: essays on religion, politics, society, identity and… football, edited by Joseph M. Bradley. Glandaruel: Argyll Publishing, 2004: 19-83.
    • Canning, Bernard J. ‘Donegal Priests in Scotland, 1829-1979’, Donegal Annual 35 (1983): 43–58.
    • ———. ‘Donegal Association in Glasgow, 1877-1977’, Donegal Annual 42, 1990: 4–16.
    • Foster, John, Muir Houston & Chris Madigan, ‘Distinguishing Catholics and Protestants among Irish Immigrants to Clydeside: A New Approach to Immigration and Ethnicity in Victorian Britain’, Irish Studies Review, 10(2), 2002: 171-192.
    • ———. ‘Sectarianism, Segregation and Politics on Clydeside in the Later Nineteenth Century’. In New Perspectives on the Irish in Scotland, edited by Martin J. Mitchell. Edinburgh: John Donald, 2008.
    • ———. ‘Irish Immigrants in Scotland’s Shipyards and Coalfields: Employment Relations, Sectarianism and Class Formation’. Historical Research 84(226), 2011: 657–92.
    • Gallagher, Tom. ‘A Tale of Two Cities : Communal Strife in Glasgow and Liverpool before 1914’, in The Irish in the Victorian City, edited by Roger Swift and Sheridan Gilley (London: Croom Helm, 1985), 106–29.
    • Gordon, Michèle and Jens Gründler, ‘Migration, Survival Strategies and Networks of Irish Paupers in Glasgow, 1850-1900’, in Being Poor in Modern Europe : Historical Perspectives 1800-1940, edited by Andreas Gestrich, Steven King, and Raphael Lutz. Oxford: Peter Lang, 2006): 113–34.
    • Kehoe, S. Karly, ‘Irish migrants and the recruitment of Catholic sisters in Glasgow, 1847-1878’ in Ireland and Scotland in the nineteenth century, edited by Frank Ferguson and James Richard Redmond McConnel. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2009: 35-47.
    • Kelly, Laura. ‘Migration and Medical Education: Irish Medical Students at the University of Glasgow, 1859–1900’. Irish Economic and Social History 39 (2012): 39–55.
    • William Kenefick, ‘Irish Dockers and Trade Unionism on Clydeside’, Irish Studies Review 5(19), 1997: 22–29.
    • ———. ‘Jewish and Catholic Irish Relations : The Glasgow Waterfront c.1880-1914’, in Jews and Port Cities, 1590-1990: Commerce, Community and Cosmopolitanism, edited by David Cesarini and Gemma Romain. London: Vallentine Mitchell, 2006: 215–34.
    • Lehoe, S. ‘Early Irish Migrants and the Recruitment of Catholic Sisters in Glasgow, 1847–1878’. In Ireland and Scotland in the Nineteenth Century, edited by Frank Ferguson and James Richard Redmond McConnel. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2009: 35–47
    • Terence McBride, ‘Irishness in Glasgow, 1863–70’, Immigrants & Minorities 24(1), 2006: 1–21.
    • ———. The Experience of Irish Migrants to Glasgow, Scotland, 1863-1891: A New Way of Being Irish. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 2006
    • ———. ‘The Secular and the Radical in Irish Associational Culture of Mid-Victorian Glasgow’. Immigrants & Minorities 28(1), 2010: 31–41.
    • ———. ‘Fenianism and Irish Associational Culture in Glasgow, 1863-1891’. In Romantic Ireland: From Tone to Gonne; Fresh Perspectives on Nineteenth-Century Ireland, edited by Paddy Lyons, John Miller, and Willy Maley. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publisher, 2013: 90–104.
    • ———. ‘Ribbonmen and Radicals : The Cultivation of Irishness and the Promotion of Active Citizenship in Mid-Victorian Glasgow’, Irish Studies Review 23(1), 2015: 15–32
    • Maloney, Paul. ‘“Flying down the Saltmarket”: The Irish on the Glasgow Music Hall Stage’. Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film 36(1), 2009: 11–36.
    • Richard B. McCready, ‘Revising the Irish in Scotland : The Irish in Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Scotland’, in The Irish Diaspora, edited Andy Bielenberg (Harlow: Longman, 2000), 37–50.
    • McFarland, Elaine. ‘The Making of an Irishman: John Ferguson (1836-1906) and the Politics of Identity in Victorian Glasgow’. Immigrants & Minorities 27(2–3), 2009: 194–211.
    • Ian Meredith, ‘Irish Migrants in the Scottish Episcopal Church in the Nineteenth Century’, in New Perspectives on the Irish in Scotland, ed. Martin J. Mitchell (Edinburgh: John Donald, 2008), 44–64.
    • ———. ‘Irish Episcopalians in the Scottish Episcopal Diocese of Glasgow and Galloway during the Nineteenth Century’. Immigrants & Minorities 27(2–3), 2009: 248–278.
    • Ó Catháin, Máirtín. ‘’Dying Irish’ : Eulogising the Irish in Scotland in Glasgow Observer Obituaries’, Innes Review 61(1), 2010: 76–91
    • Ó Dochartaigh, Cathair, ‘Idir dhá thír: Donegal Emigrants in Glasgow’ in Glasgow: baile mòr nan Gàidheal = City of the Gaels, edited by Shelia M. Kidd. Glasgow: 150-160.
    • Sloan, William, ‘Religious affiliation and the immigrant experience: Catholic Irish and Protestant highlanders in Glasgow, 1830-1850’ in Irish immigrants and Scottish society in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, edited by Thomas M. Devine. Edinburgh: John Donald, 2001: 67-90.
    • Vaughan, Géraldine, ‘Irish immigrants and local politics in the monklands: a path to integration?’ in Beyond the anchoring grounds: more cross-currents in Irish and Scottish studies, edited by Shane Alcobia-Murphy. Belfast: Queen’s University Belfast, 2005.
  • Govan
    • Foster, John, Muir Houston, and Chris Madigan. ‘Irish Immigrants in Scotland’s Shipyards and Coalfields: Employment Relations, Sectarianism and Class Formation’. Historical Research 84(226), 2011: 657–692.
  • Greenock
    • Lobban, R. D. ‘The Irish Community in Greenock in the Nineteenth Century’. Irish Geography 6(3), 1971: 270–81.
  • Paisley
    • Collins, B.M. ‘Irish Emigration to Dundee and Paisley during the First Half of the Nineteenth Century’. In Irish Population, Economy, and Society: Essays in Honour of the Late K.H. Connell, edited by Kenneth Hugh Connell and J.M. Goldstrom. Wotton-under-Edge: Clarendon Press, 1981: 192–212
  • Renfrewshire
    • Coffey, Michael J. ‘The Irish in Scotland. North East Clare Migration to Renfrewshire’, Sliabh Aughty: Journal of the East Clare Heritage Group 11, 2003: 5–10.
  • Wigtownshire
    • Brack, Arthur. Irish Marriages in the Parishes of Portpatrick, Stranraer, Stonykirk & Leswalt in Wigtownshire., Old Parochial Registers (Dumfries and Galloway Family History Society). Dumfries: Dumfries and Galloway Family History Research Centre, 2006.

Wales

  • Evans, Neil. ‘Immigrants and minorities in Wales, 1840-1990: a comparative perspective’ in A tolerant nation: exploring ethnic diversity in Wales, edited by Charlotte Williams, Neil Evans & Paul O’Leary. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2003: 14-34.
  • ———. ‘Comparing Immigrant Histories: The Irish and Others in Modern Wales’, in Irish Migrants in Modern Wales, edited by Paul O’Leary. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2004: 156–78
  • Miskell, Louise. ‘“The Heroic Irish Doctor”? Irish Immigration  in the Medical Profession in Nineetenth-Century Wales’. In Ireland Abroad: Politics and Professions in the Nineteenth Century, edited by Oonagh Walsh. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2002: 82–94
  • O’Leary, Paul. ‘Irish immigration and the Catholic “Welsh District” 1840-1850’ in Politics and society in Wales, 1840-1922, edited by Geraint H. Jenkins & B. J. Smith. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1988: 29-45.
  • ———. ‘Anti-Irish Riots in Wales, 1826-1882’. Llafur 5(4), 1991: 27–36
  • ———. Immigration and Integration: The Irish in Wales, 1798-1922. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2002.
  • ———. ‘The Cult of Respectability and the Irish in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Wales’, in Irish Migrants in Modern Wales, edited by Paul O’Leary. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2004: 119–138
  • ———. ‘When Was Anti-Catholicism? The Case of Nineteenth-and Twentieth-Century Wales’. Journal of Ecclesiastical History 56(2), 2005: 308–325.
  • Roberts, Owen G., ‘Migrating Into the Mainstream of Welsh History: The Irish and Others in Modern Wales’, Llafur 9(1), 2004: 107-115.
  • South Wales
    • Miskell, Louise. ‘Custom, Conflict and Community : A Study of the Irish in South Wales and Cornwall, 1861-1891.’ PhD, University of Wales, Aberystwyth, 1996.
    • ———. ‘Reassessing the Anti-Irish Riot: Popular Protest and the Irish in South Wales, c. 1826–1882’. In Irish Migrants in Modern Wales, edited by Paul O’Leary. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2004: 101–118
    • ———. ‘“Operating in the Ethnic Sphere”: Irish Migrant Networks and the Question of Respectability in Nineteenth-Century South Wales’. Immigrants & Minorities 23(2–3), 2005: 233–253.
    • Morris, David. ‘“Gone to Work to America”: Irish Step-Migration through South Wales in the 1860s and 1870s’. Immigrants & Minorities 34(3), 2016: 297–313.
    • ———. ‘Peaks and Troughs: Irish Transmigration Through South Wales, 1850-1900’Welsh History Review 28(2), 2016: 283-306.
    • Neal, Frank. ‘South Wales, the Coal Trade and the Irish Famine Refugee Crisis’, in Irish Migrants in Modern Wales, edited by Paul O’Leary. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2004: 9–33.
    • Summers, Veronica. ‘‘A Source of Sad Annoyance’: The Irish and Crime in South Wales’. Irish Identities in Victorian Britain 27(2–3), 2009: 172
  • Cardiff
    • Hickey, John Vincent. Urban Catholics: Urban Catholicism in England and Wales from 1829 to the Present Day. Geoffrey Chapman, 1967.
    • ———. ‘Irish Settlement in Nineteenth-Century Cardiff’, in Irish Migrants in Modern Wales, edited by Paul O’Leary. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2004: 34–53
    • Lewis, C. Roy. ‘The Irish in Cardiff in the Mid-Nineteenth Century’. Cambria 7(1), 1980: 13–41.
  • Maesteg
    • McCormack, Gerald, The shamrock and leek: the Irish in south Wales, Maesteg & district, mid Glamorgan, 1826-1985, s.p., 1993
  • Merthyr Tydfil
    • O’Leary, Paul. ‘Mass Commodity Culture and Identity: The Morning Chronicle and Irish Migrants in a Nineteenth-Century Welsh Industrial Town’. Urban History 35(2), 2008: 237–254.
  • Newport
    • Williams, Chris. ‘“Decorous and Creditable”: The Irish in Newport’, in Irish Migrants in Modern Wales, edited by Paul O’Leary. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2004: 54–82
  • Swansea
    • Price, Roger T. Little Ireland: Aspects of the Irish and Greenhill, Swansea. Swansea: Swansea City Council, 1992.
  • Tredegar
    • Parry, Jon. ‘The Tredegar Anti-Irish Riots 1882. Llafur 3(4), 1983
  • Wrexham
    • Peter Jones, ‘The Irish in Wrexham, 1850–1880’, in Irish Migrants in Modern Wales, edited by Paul O’Leary. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2004: 83–100